DoLE logo, other boners draw Martin's ire

The state-run Philippine News Agency on Friday inadvertently used the logo of a pineapple company with the same acronym as the Department of Labor and Employment in announcing the government’s pay rules for the non-working holidays in 2018.

The article’s thumbnail, published at around 7:56 p.m., contains the logo of American agricultural multi-national corporation Dole Food Co., which has a huge plantation in Polomolok, South Cotabato. It appeared to have been replaced by the correct logo of the Labor department at around 9:45 p.m.

The state newswire later issued an erratum at around 11 p.m., saying that they committed a “careless act.”

“In an effort to ensure that all stories are accompanied by a photo, the staff inadvertently attached the wrong photo rather than the logo of the Department of Labor and Employment,” the PNA editors said.

“Rest assured appropriate action is being taken in pursuit of the delivery of accurate information to our readers. Our apologies,” they added.

The latest faux pas came after the state news wire over the weekend fell for a propaganda by Chinese state news agency Xinhua, carrying a scathing commentary attacking the arbitration award won by the Philippines as an “ill-founded award.”

The state news wire likewise drew flak last May, when it used a photograph from the Vietnam War in a story about the Marawi siege.

That same month, it likewise posted erroneous information claiming that 95 nations in the 27th Universal Period Review of the UN Human Rights Council were convinced that there were no extrajudicial killings in the Philippines.

PNA’s latest mistake finally drew the ire of Communications Secretary Martin Andanar, who threatened the two top bosses of PNA getting assigned to “Basilan or Jolo” after the wire-service state firm once again became the subject of ridicule.

“If they will not give an adequate justification to avoid disciplinary action, then I will send them to Basilan or Jolo,” said Andanar.

Communications Secretary Martin Andanar

Andanar admitted getting pissed off amid the state news wire’s recent blunders.

“Maiintindihan ko na sana [I kind of understood it] because of the information exchange with many international news wire agencies like Xinhua,” he said.

“And then last night, another editor made that mistake with Dole the corporation and DOLE the department. Akala siguro ng gunggong na editor na Dole ito na korporasyon [The stupid editor might have thought that this was Dole, the corporation]” Andanar added.

The Labor Department order for the computation of holiday pay comes after Duterte’s Presidential Proclamation No. 269, declaring the regular holidays and special non-working holidays for 2018.

Labor Advisory No. 10, s. 2017 on “Payment of Wages for the Regular Holidays and Special (Non-Working) Holidays for the Year 2018,” will guide private sector employers on the list of holidays for 2018 and how wages are computed if their workers opted to report for work on such days.

Regular holidays are New Year’s Day (January 1), Maundy Thursday (March 29), Good Friday (March 30), Araw ng Kagitingan (April 9), Labor Day (May 1), Independence Day (June 12), National Heroes Day (August 27), Bonifacio Day (November 30), Christmas Day (December 25), and Rizal Day (December 30).

Also included are the observance of Eid’l Fitr and Eidul Adha, the proclamations of which will be issued after the approximate dates of the Islamic Holidays have been determined in accordance with the Islamic calendar or the lunar calendar, or upon Islamic astronomical calculations.

For these holidays, work done during these days shall be paid 200 percent of an employee’s regular pay for the first eight hours or [(Daily Rate +COLA) x 200%]; while work done in excess of eight hours (overtime), shall be paid an additional 30% of the employee’s hourly rate or [(Hourly Rate of the basic daily wage x 200% x 130% x number of hours worked)].

Meanwhile, work done during these days that also falls on employee’s rest day shall be paid an additional 30% of his/her daily rate of 200% or [(Daily Rate + COLA) x 200%] + [30% (Daily rate x 200%)]; while for work done in excess of eight hours (overtime), shall be paid an additional 30% of his/her hourly rate, or [(Hourly Rate of the basic daily wage x 200% x 130% x 130% x number of hours worked)].

However, if the employee did not report to work during these days, he/she shall still be paid 100% of his/her salary for that day or [(Daily Rate + COLA) x 100%].

The special (non-working days), on the other hand, are Chinese New Year (February 16), Edsa Revolution Anniversary (February 25), Black Saturday (March 31), Ninoy Aquino Day (August 21), and All Saints Day (November 1). December 31, December 24 and November 2 are additional special non-working days.

The pay rules for these holidays provide that for work done, an employee shall be paid an additional 30 percent of his daily rate on the first eight hours or [(Daily Rate x 130%) + COLA]; while for work done in excess of eight hours (overtime), he/she shall be paid an additional 30% of his hourly rate or [(Hourly Rate of the basic daily wage x 130% x 130% x number of hours worked)].

For work done during these days that also fall on employee’s rest day, he/she shall be paid an additional 50 percent of his/her daily rate on the first eight hours, or [(Daily Rate x 150%) + COLA]; while for work done in excess of eight hours (overtime), he/she shall be paid an additional 30% of his hourly rate, or [(Hourly Rate of the basic daily wage x 150% x 130% x number of hours worked)].

But if the employee did not work, the”‘no work, no pay” principle shall apply unless there is a favorable company policy, practice or collective bargaining agreement (CBA) granting payment on special holidays.